Thursday, January 17, 2013

Fiction Writing Tips (for the Dedicated Writer)

Fiction Writing Tips



Writing a novel can be challenging at times, so here are a few tips to help you along the way. If you love what you do, it won't feel like hard work. Precise and thoroughly researched writing will enhance your craft and will deliver a better product.

The writing tips below focus on the technical and creative writing process rather than the business end of things. You can take a few of these writing tips or take them all. And add your own fiction writing tips by leaving a comment.

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1. Read more fiction than you write.

2. Don’t lock yourself into one genre (in reading or writing). Even if you have a favorite genre, step outside of it once in awhile so you don’t get too weighed down by trying to fit your work into a particular category.

3. Dissect stories you love from books, film, and television to find out what works in storytelling and what doesn’t.

4. Remember the credence of all writers: butt in chair, hands on keyboard.

5. Don’t write for the market. Tell the story that’s in your heart.

6. You can make an outline before, during, or after you finish your rough draft. An outline is not necessary, nor is it written in stone, but it can provide you with a roadmap, and that is a mighty powerful tool to have at your disposal.

7. You don’t always need an outline. Give discovery writing a try.

8. Some of the best fiction comes from real life. Jot down stories that interest you whether you hear them from a friend or read them in a news article.

9. Real life is also a great source of inspiration for characters. Look around at your friends, family, and coworkers. Magnify the strongest aspects of their personalities and you’re on your way to crafting a cast of believable characters.

10. Make your characters real through details. A girl who bites her nails or a guy with a limp will be far more memorable than characters who are presented in lengthy head-to-toe physical descriptions.

11. The most realistic and relatable characters are flawed. Find something good about your villain and something dark in your hero’s past.

12. Avoid telling readers too much about the characters. Instead, show the characters’ personalities through their actions and interactions.

13. Give your characters difficult obstacles to overcome. Make them suffer. That way, when they triumph, it will be even more rewarding.

14. Explore the human condition.

15. Make sure you understand the three act structure. Every story needs a beginning, a middle, and an end.

16. Memorize the Hero’s Journey. Use it.

17. Cultivate a distinct voice. Your narrator should not sound warm and friendly in the first few chapters and then objective and aloof in later chapters. The voice should be consistent and it should have a tone that complements the content of your book.

18. Give careful consideration to the narrative. Is the story best told in first person or third person? If you’re not sure, write a few pages in each narrative style to see what works best.

19. Is your story moving too fast for readers or are they yawning through every paragraph? Are the love scenes too short? Are the fight scenes too long? Do you go into three pages of detail as your characters walk from point A to point B and then fly through an action sequence in a couple of short paragraphs? Pay attention to pacing!

20. Infuse your story with rich themes to give it a humanistic quality. Examples of themes include sacrifice, redemption, rebirth, life and death, faith, destiny, etc. These are the big shadows that hover over your story.

21. Use symbols and imagery to create continuity throughout your story. Think about how the White
Rabbit kept popping up when Alice was adventuring in Wonderland or how the color red was used in the film American Beauty. These are subtle details but they give your story great power.

22. Every great story includes transformation. The characters change, the world changes, and hopefully, the reader will change too.

23. Aim for a story that is both surprising and satisfying. The only thing worse than reading a novel and feeling like you know exactly what’s going to happen is reading a novel and feeling unfulfilled at the end — like what happened wasn’t what was supposed to happen. Your readers invest themselves in your story. They deserve an emotional and intellectual payoff.

24. Focus on building tension, then give it a snap.

25. Enrich your main plot with subplots. In real life, there’s a lot happening at once. While the characters are all trying to get rescued from the aliens, romances are brewing, traitors are stewing, and friendships are forged.

26. There is a difference between a sub-plot and a tangent. Don’t go off on too many tangents. It’s okay to explore various branches of your story when you’re working through the first or second draft, but eventually, you have to pare it down to its core.

27. If you write in a genre, don’t be afraid to blur the lines. A drama can have funny moments and a thriller can have a bit of romance.

28. Make sure your setting is vivid and realistic even if you made it up.

29. If you didn’t make up your setting, then do your best to get to the location and see it for yourself before you finish your manuscript. If that’s not possible, get busy researching.

30. Don’t underestimate your readers. Assume they are as smart (or smarter) than you are.

31. Give the readers room to think. You don’t have to tell your story in minute detail, including each minute of the plot’s timeline or all of the characters’ thoughts. Provide enough dots, and trust that the reader will have fun connecting them.

32. Let the readers use their imaginations. Provide a few choice details and let the readers fill in the rest of the canvas with their own colors.

33. Don’t focus exclusively on storytelling at the expense of crafting compelling language.

34. Appeal to readers’ senses. Use descriptive words that engage the readers’ senses of taste, touch, and smell.

35. Apply poetry techniques to breathe life into your prose. Use alliteration, onomatopoeia, metaphor, and other literary devices to make your sentences sing and dance.

36. When rewriting, check for the following: plot holes, character inconsistencies, missing scenes, extraneous scenes, accuracy in research, and of course, grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

37. As you revise, ask yourself whether every paragraph, sentence, and word is essential to your story. If it’s not, you know where the delete button is.

38. Proofread carefully for grammar, spelling, and punctuation. The fewer typos in your final draft, the better.

39. Before your final revisions and before you send your manuscript out to any agents or editors, find your beta readers: join a writing group, take a fiction workshop, or hire a pro.

40. Do not send out your rough draft. Go through the rewriting process at least three times before handing it out to your beta readers. The stronger it is when you bring in editors, the stronger those editors will be able to make it.
 
41. Collect and use these and other writing tips in a file or in your notebook. When something about your story doesn’t feel quite right or if you sense there’s something missing, your notes and other resources might provide you with a solution.

42. Have fun. If you’re not enjoying writing, then maybe it’s not for you. If you’re not enjoying fiction writing, try something else like poetry, blogging, or screenwriting. Be open and you’ll find your way.

Did you find these writing tips helpful? Got any tips to add? Leave a comment!

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9 comments:

  1. I like the name of your blog. Thanks for the follow. Would you mind adding your blog to my book blog exchange? Here's the link-http://www.ifeelsounnecessary.com/p/book-nerd-blog-exchange.html

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks. I signed up for the book blog exchange.

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  3. It wasn't added, something messed up on the page. Sorry, but would you mind adding it again?

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    Replies
    1. Lisa,

      I just tried adding again. Hopefully, it goes through this time. Thanks, J

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    2. It's added, knowing me I did something wrong.

      Delete
  4. Some really great tips there, Jeanette. Nothing I can add but will be sure to use these as I progress. Thanks.

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  5. Hi just nominated you for the Liebster Blog Award http://jellybeanarson.blogspot.com/2013/01/liebster-blog-award.html

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for the nomination. Fourth one! I'll get on it. It's so much fun. Thanks again!

      Delete